Hotels and Accommodation – Disability friendly rooms/ accessible / wheelchair friendly

In this post I am going to talk about how accommodation (hotels, guest houses, etc) advertised as accessible and disability friendly is not inclusive for all disabled people.

Oftentimes, accommodation is presented as accessible or ‘disability friendly’ when it is not. Many hotels, holiday homes and cottages are described as fully accessible when they lack certain facilities that are necessary for people with severe disabilities to use and be unrestricted. When searching for somewhere to stay in the UK, there are certain facilities and features that I need which are largely lacking. I find myself checking off criteria on numerous websites only to find a major problem. On the plus side, features such as ramped access, wide spaces, en-suite bathrooms and grab rails, are included, but for the most part two vital pieces of equipment are missing. The most important piece of equipment for many with physical disabilities is a hoist, and not enough places provide them. A powered bed is also a very important need but one I find secondary to the hoist as it is possible to cope without. Therefore, these places are not satisfying the needs of all disabled people so should not really claim to be accessible for all disabilities.

For many people with severe physical disabilities like myself, grab rails and ramps are not enough to make a room truly accessible. Because of my limited function, I require the hoist so I can use the toilet, wash, get dressed and go to bed, and far too many places don’t have this vital equipment. Either mobile or ceiling tracked, having a hoist is the make or break issue when trying to go away anywhere. Though mobile hoists are welcome, ceiling tracked hoists are so much more convenient and easier to use, but very few places install them. As a side note, mobile hoists can sometimes be restrictive due to the size and can be blocked if a bed is too low to the ground, but ceiling hoists avoid any such problems.

Hoists open up the accommodation to a much larger group and allow people with disabilities to travel and participate in ‘normal’ activities that everyone should have access too. Furthermore, the equipment does not break the bank in terms of cost, it can be locked when not in use, and doesn’t prevent anyone from staying.

I don’t think that it comes from a place of malice but one of lack of knowledge. If more people are made aware of the issues they can respond to them. Ideally, many more places would have at least some rooms with ceiling track hoists and electric powered beds. I think that there may be some benefit for people in charge of accommodation having more help and guidance, perhaps even from the government, to ensure everyone can indeed access such places.  

When I went holiday in 2018, it was so nice for me and my family to be able to go somewhere where my needs were fully taken care of. The owner had experience with a disabled family member so had installed a ceiling track hoist into a bathroom and an adjustable powered bed. It gave us so much freedom as there was no fear of not having somewhere to get changed or sleep comfortably.

Hello and Welcome!

My name is Matt and I have Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. I’ve wanted to write a blog for some time to talk about my disability and provide an insight into living with the condition. Hopefully this will help other young men with Duchenne, and their families, to deal with the trials and tribulations that come with it in a positive way!

I want to discuss some of the bigger problems you may encounter along the way and share some of my own experiences, to show that life with a disability is just as enjoyable and fulfilling as living without one.